Skylink Express

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LOCBC
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Skylink Express

Post by LOCBC » Sun Sep 01, 2019 11:06 am

Hello Everyone,
A phone interview coming up with above company for FO position if someone can give me a heads up what to expect that would be great. Feel free to PM.
Thanks for your time
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Namttej
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Re: Skylink Express

Post by Namttej » Sun Sep 01, 2019 1:55 pm

All technical IFR questions. Have never done an interview with them but know someone who just did and said it was all technical.
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ehv8oar
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Re: Skylink Express

Post by ehv8oar » Sun Sep 08, 2019 8:44 am

Sorry for the thread hijack but anyone know if they do rotational?
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glidr
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Re: Skylink Express

Post by glidr » Mon Nov 04, 2019 2:10 pm

Interview feedback on SkyLink in British Columbia:

This was for early summer-2019. Thorough interview. I was happy to get an offer with this solid company. (No comment on if I joined...)

These are my personal notes from the interview, to help others who are self-motivated to prepare. Pls excuse my omissions and abbreviations.

*******
Can have CAP GEN in hand, electronic OK (and recommended so you can do quick find searches).
About an hour long.

Hours review from resume and logbook
Multi time?
IFR time – last PPC completed?
Turbine time?
Current medical?


1) Questions about the company, what we stand for? What do we transport? Bases? Westward expansion as of 2013. 10 M # cargo in 2018. Founded 1996.
2) Willing to relocate if required?
3) Where do you see yourself in 3-5 years?
4) Describe what you can bring to the company that other pilots cannot.
5) Flying work history.
6) What would your chief pilot references say about you?

7) IFR Questions:
8 ) Are there any restrictions below 10k feet? (250kt. KIAS or KCAS?)
9) Speed restriction approaching a controlled airport? (10nm controlled below 3k ft be below 200 kts. KIAS)
10) Speed restr in a hold for a turbo prop aircraft? 175 kts
11) Does this restr change with altitude?
12) Time rqd for the inbound leg for hold at 10k feet?
13) What are the requirements for a standard IFR departure? (1/2 mile RVR 2600)
14) Jepsen plates…Do Jepps have SpecVis on departure?
15) Purpose of a SpecVis in a departure? (Evaluation of risks: allows variation to standard vis requirements due to : lighting, terrain, vis)
16) Category of 1900? (Cat C)
17) Min vis required for a SpecVis departure for a Cat C aircraft?
18) Value required for reduced vis operations? (RVR 2600)
19) Is it exactly RVR 2600? (when vis is BELOW 2600)
20) Where would you find For YVR, take off min for special (non-standard mins)
21) Required Climb gradients 200 ft/nm standard … but how about abnormal. Is this for two engine or single engine? (SE)
22) Alternate APT Weather minima…CAP Gen… What are the weather minima requirements to use an airport that has one precision approach as an alternate? (600-2 or 300-1 above HAT).
23) If for this airport, the decision height is 400 AGL, advisory VIS is ½ SM, what is the lowest ceiling and vis required to use this APT as an alternate? (600-2, 300-1 rule, if VIS is ½ that’s at minimum, cannot use 600-2 rule, with 300-1 also not meeting mins, need 400-1.)
24) Can the PIC use the sliding scale in this approach? (TFA vs GFA, sliding 700-1/2 or 800-1; have TAF, can use ___). If DA is 400, and VIS is ½: Add 300-1 to the two values = 700-1 ½. Which is higher? 600-2 or 700- 1 ½? But tricky question… The std is 600-2, but need at least 700 AGL …… then sliding scale…but requires standard 600-2 to use scale…
25) Cold weather corrections: example of an altitude that does not required a CWC? (when radar vectored, IRF assigned altitudes)
26) For an alternate APT with no IFR APPR, what is the lowest ceiling? (500 below min IFR altitude). ________________________________________________________________________
27) Can you use an NDB APPR using LOC overlay approach?
28) Doing ILS APPR, FAF is NDB; Before FAF, notice NDB goes unserviceable before FAF, can you continue ILS APPR beyond NDB. (ILS FAF is GS intercept; continue).
29) What methods to identify the FAF if NDB is unserviceable? (Cross radial of VOR; ATC identify; DME).
30) APT has 2 NDB approaches: NDB A and NDB RWY 15. What is the difference between the two?
31) For Category 3 AC, when doing a circling approach, what is the protected radius around the airport? (1.7 NM)
32) Where is it measured from? (Departure end radius)
33) Circling APPR, RWY on right, enter cloud. What to do? (Go Missed)
34) Requirements for a contact APPR? (clear of clouds, 1 SM VIS)
35) Why do we do contact APPR? (Still IFR APPR = Safety. Operational time/reduce fuel)
36) What procedure for missed used for a contact APPR?
37) Requirements for visual APPR (VIS 5 sm, VFR, etc. )
38) Turbine operations: Operations for a “free turbine engines”)
39) Describe the concepts of a reverse flow turbine engine.
40) How does a pressurized aircraft receive pressurized air?
41) How does the outflow valve operate?
42) What is the significance of the V1 speed?
43) What speed must be maintained after takeoff with one engine out (Vyse, “Blue Line”).

44) Scenarios: Two crew operations…what are the primary roles of the PNF?
45) Describe conflict with other pilots. How resolved?
46) Do you find that subordinates will fall subject to the power/seniority imbalance?
47) Describe a situation where your decision-making was tested?
48) Have you ever been CADOR’ed?
49) What is the toughest decision you have made in aviation?
50) Describe the reporting procedure following a landing after … (I forget the rest)…. Incident vs.
51) Symbol for Vfe? Scenario: If there is a Vfe of 100, and flaps go down at 101, what reporting procedures?
52) Reporting for Gear down in excess of Vge?
53) What is SMS?
54) Scenario: Capt. is late, looking tired, what would you do?
55) If not comfortable flying with this Capt., what to do?
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C.W.E.
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Re: Skylink Express

Post by C.W.E. » Mon Nov 04, 2019 5:22 pm

28) Doing ILS APPR, FAF is NDB; Before FAF, notice NDB goes unserviceable before FAF, can you continue ILS APPR beyond NDB.
Good to see they ask questions about things that happen very frequently. :rolleyes:
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LegoMan
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Re: Skylink Express

Post by LegoMan » Mon Nov 04, 2019 6:36 pm

glidr wrote:
Mon Nov 04, 2019 2:10 pm
Interview feedback on SkyLink in British Columbia:

This was for early summer-2019. Thorough interview. I was happy to get an offer with this solid company. (No comment on if I joined...)

These are my personal notes from the interview, to help others who are self-motivated to prepare. Pls excuse my omissions and abbreviations.

*******
Can have CAP GEN in hand, electronic OK (and recommended so you can do quick find searches).
About an hour long.

Hours review from resume and logbook
Multi time?
IFR time – last PPC completed?
Turbine time?
Current medical?


1) Questions about the company, what we stand for? What do we transport? Bases? Westward expansion as of 2013. 10 M # cargo in 2018. Founded 1996.
2) Willing to relocate if required?
3) Where do you see yourself in 3-5 years?
4) Describe what you can bring to the company that other pilots cannot.
5) Flying work history.
6) What would your chief pilot references say about you?

7) IFR Questions:
8 ) Are there any restrictions below 10k feet? (250kt. KIAS or KCAS?)
9) Speed restriction approaching a controlled airport? (10nm controlled below 3k ft be below 200 kts. KIAS)
10) Speed restr in a hold for a turbo prop aircraft? 175 kts
11) Does this restr change with altitude?
12) Time rqd for the inbound leg for hold at 10k feet?
13) What are the requirements for a standard IFR departure? (1/2 mile RVR 2600)
14) Jepsen plates…Do Jepps have SpecVis on departure?
15) Purpose of a SpecVis in a departure? (Evaluation of risks: allows variation to standard vis requirements due to : lighting, terrain, vis)
16) Category of 1900? (Cat C)
17) Min vis required for a SpecVis departure for a Cat C aircraft?
18) Value required for reduced vis operations? (RVR 2600)
19) Is it exactly RVR 2600? (when vis is BELOW 2600)
20) Where would you find For YVR, take off min for special (non-standard mins)
21) Required Climb gradients 200 ft/nm standard … but how about abnormal. Is this for two engine or single engine? (SE)
22) Alternate APT Weather minima…CAP Gen… What are the weather minima requirements to use an airport that has one precision approach as an alternate? (600-2 or 300-1 above HAT).
23) If for this airport, the decision height is 400 AGL, advisory VIS is ½ SM, what is the lowest ceiling and vis required to use this APT as an alternate? (600-2, 300-1 rule, if VIS is ½ that’s at minimum, cannot use 600-2 rule, with 300-1 also not meeting mins, need 400-1.)
24) Can the PIC use the sliding scale in this approach? (TFA vs GFA, sliding 700-1/2 or 800-1; have TAF, can use ___). If DA is 400, and VIS is ½: Add 300-1 to the two values = 700-1 ½. Which is higher? 600-2 or 700- 1 ½? But tricky question… The std is 600-2, but need at least 700 AGL …… then sliding scale…but requires standard 600-2 to use scale…
25) Cold weather corrections: example of an altitude that does not required a CWC? (when radar vectored, IRF assigned altitudes)
26) For an alternate APT with no IFR APPR, what is the lowest ceiling? (500 below min IFR altitude). ________________________________________________________________________
27) Can you use an NDB APPR using LOC overlay approach?
28) Doing ILS APPR, FAF is NDB; Before FAF, notice NDB goes unserviceable before FAF, can you continue ILS APPR beyond NDB. (ILS FAF is GS intercept; continue).
29) What methods to identify the FAF if NDB is unserviceable? (Cross radial of VOR; ATC identify; DME).
30) APT has 2 NDB approaches: NDB A and NDB RWY 15. What is the difference between the two?
31) For Category 3 AC, when doing a circling approach, what is the protected radius around the airport? (1.7 NM)
32) Where is it measured from? (Departure end radius)
33) Circling APPR, RWY on right, enter cloud. What to do? (Go Missed)
34) Requirements for a contact APPR? (clear of clouds, 1 SM VIS)
35) Why do we do contact APPR? (Still IFR APPR = Safety. Operational time/reduce fuel)
36) What procedure for missed used for a contact APPR?
37) Requirements for visual APPR (VIS 5 sm, VFR, etc. )
38) Turbine operations: Operations for a “free turbine engines”)
39) Describe the concepts of a reverse flow turbine engine.
40) How does a pressurized aircraft receive pressurized air?
41) How does the outflow valve operate?
42) What is the significance of the V1 speed?
43) What speed must be maintained after takeoff with one engine out (Vyse, “Blue Line”).

44) Scenarios: Two crew operations…what are the primary roles of the PNF?
45) Describe conflict with other pilots. How resolved?
46) Do you find that subordinates will fall subject to the power/seniority imbalance?
47) Describe a situation where your decision-making was tested?
48) Have you ever been CADOR’ed?
49) What is the toughest decision you have made in aviation?
50) Describe the reporting procedure following a landing after … (I forget the rest)…. Incident vs.
51) Symbol for Vfe? Scenario: If there is a Vfe of 100, and flaps go down at 101, what reporting procedures?
52) Reporting for Gear down in excess of Vge?
53) What is SMS?
54) Scenario: Capt. is late, looking tired, what would you do?
55) If not comfortable flying with this Capt., what to do?
Would you mind telling us your total time?
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glidr
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Re: Skylink Express

Post by glidr » Mon Nov 04, 2019 11:54 pm

...Would you mind telling us your total time?...

For sake of anonymity I would prefer to decline, but I have experience. Signing off...
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200Above
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Re: Skylink Express

Post by 200Above » Tue Nov 05, 2019 1:30 pm

Well that escalated quickly.

Reading those questions make me realize how much I’ve forgotten.... Well, in order to forget, that means I would have had to of known it in the first place.

Might read the Cap Gen or AIM on my way to yyz tomorrow.
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doiwannabeapilot
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Re: Skylink Express

Post by doiwannabeapilot » Tue Nov 05, 2019 3:00 pm

C.W.E. wrote:
Mon Nov 04, 2019 5:22 pm
28) Doing ILS APPR, FAF is NDB; Before FAF, notice NDB goes unserviceable before FAF, can you continue ILS APPR beyond NDB.
Good to see they ask questions about things that happen very frequently. :rolleyes:
what's an NDB ?
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C.W.E.
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Re: Skylink Express

Post by C.W.E. » Tue Nov 05, 2019 5:15 pm

what's an NDB ?
It as a radio transmitter that you sometimes need the B.F.O. selection on the ADF to find it.
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Liftdump
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Re: Skylink Express

Post by Liftdump » Thu Nov 07, 2019 10:08 am

An NDB is right next to the BETA machine
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cargocowboy
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Re: Skylink Express

Post by cargocowboy » Thu Nov 07, 2019 1:36 pm

Liftdump wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 10:08 am
An NDB is right next to the BETA machine
Don't laugh, Skylink Express isn't certified for RNAV approaches, so if you go work there and have forgotten what NDB's are, you will learn pretty quick.
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cargocowboy
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Re: Skylink Express

Post by cargocowboy » Thu Nov 07, 2019 3:50 pm

M
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Last edited by cargocowboy on Thu Nov 07, 2019 10:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

goingnowherefast
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Re: Skylink Express

Post by goingnowherefast » Thu Nov 07, 2019 5:41 pm

Except NDBs are everywhere. Beta players are in the same storage bin as the Microwave Landing System and right next to the turbo-compound engine.

NDBs are fantastically simple, useful and reliable old technology. Beta players and turbo-compound engines were obsolete before they ever got going.
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C.W.E.
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Re: Skylink Express

Post by C.W.E. » Fri Nov 08, 2019 10:16 am

Anyone here remember when the radio range was how we flew the airways and did IMC approaches?
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ayseven
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Re: Skylink Express

Post by ayseven » Fri Nov 08, 2019 12:12 pm

No but i remember having to learn it, and doing it on rides. We are talking latter last century Chuck!!
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doiwannabeapilot
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Re: Skylink Express

Post by doiwannabeapilot » Fri Nov 08, 2019 3:11 pm

Oh yes, now I remember.

The selector always reminds me of BTO, what a great band.
C.W.E. wrote:
Tue Nov 05, 2019 5:15 pm
what's an NDB ?
It as a radio transmitter that you sometimes need the B.F.O. selection on the ADF to find it.
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C.W.E.
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Re: Skylink Express

Post by C.W.E. » Fri Nov 08, 2019 4:05 pm

No but i remember having to learn it, and doing it on rides. We are talking latter last century Chuck!!
O.K.....

...... here is one from 44 years ago. :mrgreen:

Arcturus, Missing Hours and Fate


Finally after over a week of just plain tough flying weather the stars came out and we would depart Johnston Point on Banks Island for what should be an easy flight. This flight would turn out to be remembered forever as one of the closest calls I have ever had in almost fifty years of flying. The year was 1975, late February. We were flying supplies to a cat train that was shooting seismic lines for oil exploration on Banks Island in the high Arctic.

Johnson Point, an oil exploration base camp with a paved runway, was the main airport for supplying the western Arctic. In these very high latitudes winter means total darkness for months and navigating in that very hostile environment is difficult at the best of times. We had just gotten our first twin otter equipped with a new navigation aid called Global Navigation System. G.N.S. was based on very low power radio transmitters located in various parts of the world. In order for the computer to be able to navigate it had to acquire at least three G.N.S. transmitters.

Latitude and longitude had to be entered, for both our departure and destination points, in the computer. This entry was done with little wheels to select the numbers and other information for each trip. A further limiting factor with G.N.S. was that we had to have accurate positions for the computer to navigate to wherever we set it. Cat trains are always on the move, consequently requiring a navigator with each train to take celestial shots whenever he could to accurately keep track of their new location.

Once the G.N.S. stations were acquired and the trip was set up it was so accurate we could fly several hundred miles and then return to our parking ramp at the airport without a hitch. To us G.N.S. was like having died and gone to heaven. Being able to navigate so accurately in the high Arctic, where the magnetic compass always points strait down, was a "god send". This particular trip to the seismic train was uneventful with no cloud cover at all just the stars from horizon to horizon. After the last week of flying all our trips from takeoff to landing on solid instruments while relying on two radar altimeters one in front of each pilot for our landing decision height this one had been easy. The only visibility restriction we had was the complete loss of forward visibility in the snow which blew up when we went into reverse to stop on the short runway, which had been ploughed for us, on the ice.

Sometimes these strips were not much over 1000 feet long due to the location of the cat train at that time therefore, reverse was a necessity to stop before we ran off the landing strip. With clear weather and no rush to get back to Johnson Point we went to the cookhouse, had a leisurely meal, listened to the tape recorder playing music such as North to Alaska, which we of course changed to South to Alaska. Finally, off to the airplane we went where we decided to hell with waiting to reset the G.N.S. Instead, with such a clear night, we would fly back to home base using the astro compass. After lighting up the two P.T.6's we taxied back to the runway and lined up with the flare pots. We got the almanac out and shot Arcturus. It is one of the easiest stars to identify and shoot due to its position and brightness in the sky. Arcturus is the first bright star out from the handle of the Big Dipper. We read our heading on the astro compass, set our direction indicators (gyros) and off we went for Johnston Point. Once levelled off in cruise there was nothing but the sound of the engines and the big canopy of stars that ended in a faint white blur which was the endless Arctic snow just barley visible below us in the faint starlight.

Sitting in the warm cockpit with only the sound of those dependable turbine engines and no sense of movement through the dark night I slowly became aware that something was wrong but could not quite figure out what it was. I remember asking the co-pilot to see if Johnson Point was showing up on the A.D.F. After a few minutes he had no luck, now I came wide awake and said, "This doesn't look right. Let's get another shot on Arcturus.". Once more I gave him the time and he read the almanac to set the astro compass. Again there was no change in our D.I. settings. All of a sudden a possibility came to me and I asked him what time he had. When he read his watch we both knew we were really in trouble as there was almost three hours difference between our watches. I will never forget the feeling of real fear when I realised that we had departed the cat train with a D.I. setting that was almost forty-five degrees in error.

The sudden realisation of just how serious our position was made it very difficult to convert the position of the stars versus what I figured they should look like. Now there was no doubt, in my mind, we were far off our track for Johnston Point, so far in fact I knew we might never be found.

Time was now critical. We had to decide which watch was right. Making a quick position guess based on nothing but the time we had flown on this heading and instinct we turned ninety degrees to the right starting a slow cruise climb for better fuel burn. All we could do now was wait and hope.

In this part of the high Arctic, at night, there is absolutely nothing but endless white, to try to recognize any feature below you is hopeless. Now both of us were really worried, questions and doubts started. Whose watch was set wrong? Had we turned the right way? Why had we not noted the runway heading after landing? Why had we not written the heading down so as to be able to confirm our star shot? Why did we not check both of our watches, especially in that the clock in the airplane did not work which in these temperatures was normal? Radio reception was so poor we could not raise anyone on H.F. or V.H.F. then all of a sudden the A.D.F. came alive and there was the Johnston Point N.D.B. strait ahead. Soon we could see the lights of our destination on the horizon. For some time I had been quite concerned about our fuel state. Seeing the lights in the distance was just to good to be true. However, to be on the safe side we stayed at eleven thousand until we could definitely make the airport as distances can be so deceiving at night in the high Arctic.

Descending through one thousand feet the low fuel light came on telling us we had eleven minutes of fuel left in the front tank. I really don't remember how much fuel remained in the rear tank. Of course, how much fuel there was in the rear tank is now a mute point. It really doesn't matter, because like in Earnest Gann's great book "Fate is the Hunter", that night so many years ago the hunter did not find my young co-pilot, whose name I cannot even recall, and me. Had we turned left instead of right we would have been so far off course it is possible no one would have ever found the airplane or us in those millions of square miles of ice and snow. After landing and going into the Atco Huts, that were our accommodations, we finally found out it was my watch that was wrong. To this day I do not really know why I chose to make the decision it was my watch, even stranger the damn thing worked just fine after this what should have been an uneventful trip.

That just leaves fate as the best explanation for my decision to turn right that night. Isn't it strange how words like Arcturus, Missing Hours and Fate can have such chilling meaning when flying airplanes?
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